Explore stories that have been chosen for further distribution…

Photo by bruce mars on Unsplash

Curation on Medium practically means that a story has been distributed through one or more topics on the platform.

A curated story can be included in Medium’s daily digest email, or it can be featured more frequently both in the app and the website to readers interested in the specific topic(s). Thus it makes sense for writers to strive for curation since their stories can get higher exposure.

This doesn’t mean that non-curated stories are necessarily of lower quality. The articles are reviewed by people and in the end, the decision…


All the stories I’ve written on Medium in one place, categorized for easy access…

Photo by Ali Yahya on Unsplash

Picture this: you read an article on Medium, you like it, clap it, and decide to follow its author. You visit their profile and start scrolling for more interesting stories. The most recent ones come up first, but there’s always the possibility of a hidden gem lying further back down. Unfortunately, chances are you’ll get tired soon and quit searching. Does this sound familiar?

It’s true that browsing one’s profile on Medium can be a time-consuming and frustrating experience. …


Mesozoic Quick Fact Series

Meet the famous T.rex and its kin…

Gorgosaurus skeleton / Ed T from Sugar Land / Wikimedia Commons

Mesozoic Quick Fact Series aims to provide interesting facts about various groups of extinct animals in a fun and readable way. We will focus on the highlights, so you don’t need to read extensive, time-consuming texts!

In this article, we will take a quick overview of the tyrannosaurs, the family of carnivorous theropods with massive skulls and terrifying teeth that includes the all-time-favorite Tyrannosaurus rex.

Let’s jump right through!

Starting with the basics…

The family of the “tyrant lizards” was erected and named after the discovery of the eponymous Tyrannosaurus in 1905. Early in their existence, tyrannosaurs were small predators with long, three-fingered forelimbs…


The alvarezsaurids drastically shrank around 100 million years ago…

Reconstructed skeleton of Patagonykus puertai / Kabacchi / Wikimedia Commons

Roughly 100 million years ago, a bizarre group of bird-like dinosaurs, known as alvarezsaurids, began to transform from ostrich-sized predators to animals the size of chickens. According to a recent study published by the University of Bristol, the drive behind this shrinking happened for a surprising reason: a dietary change that included ants and termites.

‘Alvarez’s lizards’

Alvarezsaurids literally translates to ‘Alvarez’s lizards’ in honor of the Argentinian historian Don Gregorio Alvarez. These animals were slender theropods — a diverse group of two-legged dinosaurs with hollow bones and three-toed limbs— that may have been fully feathered in real life. …


It dates back 3,000 years…

Photo by Sharkcrew / Wikimedia Commons

An international group of researchers reports the oldest shark attack victim ever discovered after examining a 3,000-year-old skeleton excavated from a burial ground at the Tsukumo archaeological site in Japan.

According to the study, the skeleton, identified as Tsukumo №24, belonged to a young to middle-aged man who met a horrendous death when a large shark attacked him near the Seto Inland Sea.

Tsukumo №24

The Tsukumo site was discovered by construction workers in 1860 with the first excavations taking place in 1915. …


A new study adds more light on the ongoing debate…

The asteroid which struck the Earth 66 million years ago years ago / Photo posted by Raspberry Shake on Twitter

After emerging during the Late Triassic Period some 230 million years ago, dinosaurs occupied every continent and were dominant in most terrestrial ecosystems for almost 150 million years. Around 66 million years ago, an enormous asteroid struck the Yucatán peninsula in Mexico triggering a wave of extinction that led to the disappearance of three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth. This cataclysmic event is known as the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction and marks the end of the Mesozoic Era. Except for birds, all dinosaurs were wiped out during this time.

Some scientists suggest dinosaurs were already beginning to lose…


June 2021 was an exciting month for (paleo)anthropology…

The ‘dragon man’ skull / Photo by John Hawks on Twitter

June 2021 was an exciting month for paleontology. Scientists learned more about the biology and behavior of a wide range of extinct animals and discovered exciting new species, including the description of Australia’s largest dinosaur and crocodilian.

You may review the most important paleontological finds from the past month below:

Except for paleontology, June 2021 was a special month for (paleo) anthropology too.

During the past 30 days, scientists discovered a previously unknown population of humans in Israel and mapped the order in which various human species appeared in the famous Denisova Cave. …


Explore exciting stories from June…

Camarasaurus skull / Ballista / Wikimedia Commons

Dear followers,

To help you keep track of the latest stories published in Tales of Prehistory, we’ve decided to set a monthly review. In June we added six new stories to the publication. All of them were chosen for further distribution on the platform.

We’ve also included a special featured story at the end of this article. Featured stories are articles published long ago that once again become available for those who may have accidentally missed them.

Enjoy your reading!

June Stories

1. The Ever-changing Image of the World’s Largest Predatory Dinosaur


Tetrapods conquered land later than previously thought…

Specimen of Tiktaalik displayed in the Field Museum in Chicago / Camelops / Wikimedia Commons

Several fascinating paleontological discoveries are taking place each month. Scientists working in the field publish numerous studies, describe new prehistoric species, and propose exciting theories about the biology and behavior of many extinct animals.

This article will do a quick recap of the most important paleontological discoveries and updates from June 2021.

Before that, be sure to check the most memorable ones from May below:

Ready? Let’s go!

Scientists discover Australia’s largest dinosaur

Starting off with an amazing discovery from Australia. …


And no one is sure why…

Photo by Laura College on Unsplash

Sharks have existed on our planet for at least 420 million years and have survived several cataclysmic events that led to the extinction of many other groups of animal and plant life. The longevity of sharks is legendary but they may have come much closer to extinction than we once believed, according to a new study, published in the journal Science.

Elizabeth Sibert at Yale University and Leah Rubin at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry found the first evidence of a previously unknown mass extinction event that occurred 19 million years ago and…

Panos Grigorakakis

Journalist| Science & Ocean Liner aficionado| Amateur Paleo-illustrator|

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